What Does a Hurricane Look Like?

Over the weekend, Hurricane Matthew tore its way through the Caribbean and the eastern coast of the United States, carving a path through Haiti and Cuba before pushing up Florida’s eastern coast and rolling off Georgia and the Carolinas.

Hurricane Matthew has caused over 1,000 deaths so far, the majority of those in Haiti, as well as caused severe damage throughout its path, both from the hurricane itself and flooding associated with the storm.

As the storm began its course, news channels broadcasted colorful radar and doppler maps showing the potential paths of the storm and where the strongest winds would hit. While these maps are informative from a scientific standpoint, they don’t show the gravity of the destruction that lies in the storm’s wake. The best understanding of the storm comes in the flood of images in its aftermath.

Hurricane Matthew cuts between Haiti and Cuba

Haiti

AFP PHOTO /LOGAN ABASSI / MINUSTAH

(AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

Cuba
(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

The storm loses strength as it approaches eastern Florida.

Florida

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

ewel Samad/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

(Jewel Samad/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images)

Hurricane Matthew rounds off Savannah, Ga. and the Carolinas causing severe flooding.

Savannah
(AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

(AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

South Carolina
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

North Carolina
REUTERS/Chris Keane - RTSROGP

(REUTERS/Chris Keane – RTSROGP)

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