The Week in Multimedia – September 19, 2016

National Geographic, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and Vox round out our top picks for this week.

National Geographic – The New Europeans: Voices from a Changing Continent

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By Robert Kunzig, Photographs and Video by Robin Hammond

This story from National Geographic encompasses many stories into one. The topic itself has many layers, and National Geographic uses many layers of multimedia to tell the stories of these refugees. The piece uses video, photography, and writing to tell the story of Europe’s changing demographic, while also incorporating individual accounts.  

The Washington Post – China is preparing to build the world’s largest ‘supercity’

Photos by Michael Robinson Chavez

Photos by Michael Robinson Chavez

This photography piece tells a full story of China’s development of a “supercity.” The housing development is slowly taking over the surrounding villages and will eventually be home to 130 million people.

The New York Times – The National Museum of African American History and Culture: I, Too, Sing America

Produced by Alicia Desantis and Josh Williams, Photographs by Lexey Swall, Written by Graham Bowley, Interviews by Tamara Best, Graphics by Anjali Singhvi, Video by Jonah M. Kessel

Produced by Alicia Desantis and Josh Williams, Photographs by Lexey Swall, Written by Graham Bowley, Interviews by Tamara Best, Graphics by Anjali Singhvi, Video by Jonah M. Kessel

This comprehensive overview of Washington, D.C.’s newest museum takes you on a virtual journey. The photos, videos, and virtual graphics help you explore the new museum, but don’t give away too much. In addition to the graphics, the piece features interviews with different artifact donors, which range from family members of people like Marian Anderson to Althea Gibson. The piece also goes into detail about the deliberate structure and layout of the museum with virtual layouts and 360 views.

Vox – Every new TV show of fall 2016, ranked

Updated by Todd VanDerWerff, Caroline Framke and Sarah Frostenson

By Todd VanDerWerff, Caroline Framke and Sarah Frostenson

Although it’s not a spectacle of a multimedia piece, the piece uses graphics in the featured photo and the impressive drop down menu allows you to narrow down your television choices based on different options. The overall piece itself doesn’t utilize a wide variety of graphics, but the drop down menu is a clever way to cater to a wide variety of interests and opinions.  

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